Being a Mom Changed Me

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Correct.

Endo day.

Growing: gangbusters.

Gaining weight: yes.

Urine: perfect. (<–I don’t remember this ever being a thing before.)

Thyroid: works.

Vitamin D: good (maybe normal?), keep taking supplement.

Post-millennial mood ring.

RISING: post-millennial mood ring lights up the exam room.

A1c: 5.8. I asked if his standard deviation is bad/too many highs-lows. Endo said according to her Dexcom download, his BG is usually in range.

What’s usually? I don’t think we have had a no hitter this entire quarter. Never mind. I’ll take it. Thank you and good day.

On our way out, while I made our appointment for January, a family with 20 month(ish) old twins was on its way in.

The family’s unwieldy stroller took up 2/3rds of the waiting room and they brought their own Sesame Street potty. Jack, along for the ride, exagger-mouthed to me through the crowd, they BROUGHT a TOI-LET! When the patient in their group was called in to see the doctor, the mom told the sister twin, “You can come in too!” So of course I assumed the brother twin was the patient. He was so cheerful and robust and cute and normal-size. Of course I assumed he has T1d. (In my limited experience, reasons one might visit a peds endo = too big, too small, too diabetic.)

21602_PE106541_S5The sweet dad held the potty. The sweet mom had a confident, keeping-it-together look, and possibly had refreshed her lip gloss for the appointment. This made me think they were new. (Hand over heart to protect the heart bruise.) And (Sesame Street potty) of course I assumed they were deep into potty training madness, which, I guess you’d just forge ahead with after a new diagnosis, because what else would you do?

Once the family had left the waiting room, my guys slid right over to the tiny toy table and banged on the peg/hammer toy. Cheers to us all.

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8 responses to “Being a Mom Changed Me

  1. I wanted to believe that it was actually one of the parents who had T1D, but then I thought a) why would they still be seeing a peds endo and b) you would never bring your children to your own endo appointment.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Now that I am 62.5 years old, I suppose it won’t be long before I am taking a toilet to my endo appointments….

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Oh darn – Laddie – you made me totally crack up.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Yes! Cheers to us all! Most especially cheers to you and yours! I love that your story tells us that there is no “perfect”. And that you show us that there is no choice but to “soldier on” for our children…no matter what! The potty thing is just hilarious! But you are right….they had to keep going with whatever today’s “normal” is….like you said…❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  5. So good that he’s growing and gaining weight (for minimizing mom worry). I remember he had a few appts in a row (pre celiac diagnosis) that he hadn’t gained weight so I bet you are on cloud 9. Wait… Is nine a good color for you? What cloud do you like?

    Like

  6. skchrisman

    Your posts are so full of Yay’s and Woop’s, with a peppering of heart-squeezing Aw’s. Enjoyed this one!

    I’d be very curious to see a study of A1c’s of celiac PWDs vs. non-celiac PWDs. Anybody know of such a thing?

    Like

    • skchrisman

      Of course, I am not implying that Bs A1c is terrific bcause of being GF! That’s a no-brainer…he’s doing great because he’s YOUR kid. 🙂 I just think that being GF lends itself to being healthier overall and I’m sure there’s proof of that somewhere.

      Like

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